HAGANE NO RENKINJUTSUSHI
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FMA Philosophy, Frankenstein = FMA?
Ookami
post Mar 16 2005, 02:59 PM
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If any of you have read the original Frankenstein book, by Mary Shelley... and watched FMA... you may have noticed some odd similarities. At least, I have. Then again, I'm a loser. X3

Personally, I've come to the conclusion that the idea behind FMA may have been somehow subtly derived from Frankenstein. Yeah, I know that sounds crazy, but it really makes sense if you compare.

First off, the Philosopher's Stone is mentioned in Frankenstein in one of the earlier chapters. Big hit off right there, since that's the central focus in FMA. Next, Alphonse is the name of Victor's (the mad scientist guy) father. Another thing in common. The whole point of FMA is for Ed and Al to find the Stone and resurrect/recreate their mother... ne? Well, in Frankenstein, Victor tells his tale of using various dead body parts (human sacrifices are also needed in order to perform human alchemy, in FMA! Hah!) to create life. Finally, transmutation and chimeras are mentioned in Frankenstein, as well. For those of you who have watched FMA (or played the game), you know how big both of those are to the storyline.
Big coincidence, or something more? Kind of odd, though, considering that the book, Frankenstein, was published in 1831 in England...

Yeah. So that's my philosophy. It may not make too much sense, but... This is what happens when Ookami is bored and sugar-high. Thank you for reading. @_@;

By the way, I'm a newbie. ^^ If there's something in this post that shouldn't be, then I apologize. o___O;;


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Guest_Guest_*
post Mar 16 2005, 03:30 PM
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Well, Arakawa-san did make many references and such in the manga... a lot of the characters were named after something: Ed was officially named after 'Edward Sissorhands' Alchemy was a definate research project...and all sorts of stuff. So who knows, she may of read Frankenstein. Personally, I doubt it...a lot of people do a project that may, after all finished, be simular to another piece. For me, I am writting about 4 characters who have to face their Fate...the overall story is close to MacBeth, but I've only read it recently. So maybe it's an accident or maybe something she ment to do.
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CursedAnubis
post Mar 16 2005, 04:31 PM
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QUOTE
The whole point of FMA is for Ed and Al to find the Stone and resurrect/recreate their mother... ne?

Umm... I thought the reason for their wanting the Philospher's stone was to restore their bodies? unsure.gif


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KevLar
post Mar 16 2005, 05:17 PM
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QUOTE(CursedAnubis @ Mar 16 2005, 06:31 PM)
QUOTE
The whole point of FMA is for Ed and Al to find the Stone and resurrect/recreate their mother... ne?

Umm... I thought the reason for their wanting the Philospher's stone was to restore their bodies? unsure.gif
[snapback]134440[/snapback]


Yes, they do not want their mother back, only their bodies.


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Quistis88
post Mar 19 2005, 08:05 PM
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QUOTE(Ookami @ Mar 16 2005, 02:59 PM)
If any of you have read the original Frankenstein book, by Mary Shelley... and watched FMA... you may have noticed some odd similarities. At least, I have. Then again, I'm a loser. X3

Yes, many similarities.

QUOTE(Ookami @ Mar 16 2005, 02:59 PM)
Personally, I've come to the conclusion that the idea behind FMA may have been somehow subtly derived from Frankenstein. Yeah, I know that sounds crazy, but it really makes sense if you compare.

Although Mary Shelley has read some of the research by Paracelsus (aka Theophrastus Bombastus von Hohenheim), her main scientific basis is not alchemy, but the reanimation of dead tissues through electricity.

QUOTE(Ookami @ Mar 16 2005, 02:59 PM)
First off, the Philosopher's Stone is mentioned in Frankenstein in one of the earlier chapters. Big hit off right there, since that's the central focus in FMA. Next, Alphonse is the name of Victor's (the mad scientist guy) father. Another thing in common.

It may or may not be coincidential. Hiromu Arakawa might have been making an allusion to the famous French Kabbalist, Alphonse Louis Constant, who knew of Paracelsus.

QUOTE(Ookami @ Mar 16 2005, 02:59 PM)
The whole point of FMA is for Ed and Al to find the Stone and resurrect/recreate their mother... ne?

Victor Frankenstein's mother died as well, but his objective to create a living being is different from the motives of the Elric brothers. He simply wanted to see if it was possible to create life without biological means (asexually).

QUOTE(Ookami @ Mar 16 2005, 02:59 PM)
Finally, transmutation and chimeras are mentioned in Frankenstein, as well.

Frankenstein's monster himself is a chimera of sorts.

Yes, I have nothing more to say, really. mellow.gif


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Guest_Kao_*
post Mar 19 2005, 09:27 PM
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*Evil Mumbling* I think i shall pick up Frankenstien the book. Sounds interesting sinces its sorta related to FMA.
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Quistis88
post Mar 19 2005, 09:32 PM
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Or FMA is related to Frankenstein, since the latter came first.


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tempest_Strife
post Mar 19 2005, 11:01 PM
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Actually I did recognise the similarities, especially with the entire idea of carring unforgivable sin and delving into God's domain.

The same can be said for Dr. Jeckyl and Mr. Hyde and Fight Club. Watch the movie (or read the book) then read Dr. Jeckyl, then rewatch/read Fight Club again. It gives interesting insite to the story.. or allogory... or whatever you'd want to call Fight Club.


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Guest_Guest_*
post Mar 20 2005, 07:45 PM
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Actally, Frankenstien Monster counts more as a Homoculus.

If you want a chimeric-homoculi such were the Tao's elite Jiangshi from Shaman-King. Unlike the Monster, these corpses were pieced together with animal parts[And somehow, I can't help but think I have inspired a FMA fanfic writer with this].

But I am a bit surprised there was no guy with the name Faust[Or similar] in the FMA anime.
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Steel Alchemist
post Mar 20 2005, 08:53 PM
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What are you talking about? Frakenstein was made from MANY different body parts right??? I kinda see your point though.


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Quistis88
post Mar 20 2005, 09:06 PM
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QUOTE(Guest @ Mar 20 2005, 07:45 PM)
Actally, Frankenstien Monster counts more as a Homoculus.

If you want a chimeric-homoculi such were the Tao's elite Jiangshi from Shaman-King. Unlike the Monster, these corpses were pieced together with animal parts[And somehow, I can't help but think I have inspired a FMA fanfic writer with this].

But I am a bit surprised there was no guy with the name Faust[Or similar] in the FMA anime.

Frankenstein's monster is not a homunculus.

A homunculus, by its lexical definition, is basically a "little person." Frankenstein's monster is gigantic.

A chimera is, defined by the MSN Encarta Dictionary, "an organism, or part of one, with at least two genetically different tissues resulting from mutation, the grafting of plants, or the insertion of foreign cells into an embryo."

Therefore, Frankenstein's monster is more accurately classified as a chimera, not a homunculus.


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Guest_Guest_*
post Mar 20 2005, 09:18 PM
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Quistis: Actually, during the term for "homunculus" meant "little person." But culture made it a term for any artifically-created non mechanic being.

Wikipedia shows that
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Homunculus

But as I said, I classfied Frankenstein's monster as BOTH a chimera & a homunculus.
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Quistis88
post Mar 20 2005, 09:29 PM
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QUOTE(Guest @ Mar 20 2005, 09:18 PM)
Actually, during the term for "homunculus" meant "little person."

Incoherent sentence. Please rephrase.

QUOTE(Guest @ Mar 20 2005, 09:18 PM)
But culture made it a term for any artifically-created non mechanic being.

I did not get that impression from reading the link to the Wikipedia page on homunculi, if that's why you posted the link. However I slice it, the page still defines a homunculus as a "little man." In this thread and forum, "homunculus" is, more often than not, used in the alchemical context. Since Frankenstein's monster is not created via alchemy, he is not a homunculus.

QUOTE(Guest @ Mar 20 2005, 09:18 PM)
But as I said, I classfied Frankenstein's monster as BOTH a chimera & a homunculus.

But how can one classify him as a homunculus if he isn't one?


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Guest_Guest_*
post Mar 20 2005, 10:39 PM
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Quistis: For one thing, Alchemy is related to today's science. As the Golem was an Homoculus itself. Plus, I did remember Frankenstien used a bit of alchemy in his work to revive the dead.

The fact Frankstien is an atricially created being with various corpse pieces as the foundation of it's being should count him as one, regardless of what was repsonsible for his birth.
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Quistis88
post Mar 21 2005, 01:17 AM
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QUOTE(Guest @ Mar 20 2005, 10:39 PM)
Quistis: For one thing, Alchemy is related to today's science. As the Golem was an Homoculus itself.

But alchemy is not the exact same as today's science. And what is your definition of "golem"?

QUOTE(Guest @ Mar 20 2005, 10:39 PM)
Plus, I did remember Frankenstien used a bit of alchemy in his work to revive the dead.

Please provide textual evidence.

Frankenstein did not try to revive the dead. He sought to create life without resorting to natural means. Which version of Frankenstein did you read? Perhaps the 1818 version I read is different. I will look into the later revision Mary Shelley did when time permits.

QUOTE(Guest @ Mar 20 2005, 10:39 PM)
The fact Frankstien is an atricially created being with various corpse pieces as the foundation of it's being should count him as one, regardless of what was repsonsible for his birth.

But only chimeras are created from many genetically different pieces. A homunculus is grown whole, not pieced together.

As well, you still have not clarified what you meant by:
QUOTE
Actually, during the term for "homunculus" meant "little person."


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